Period Dramarama

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Lover of many things, including period drama. I occasionally re-blog content that is loosely related to period drama or history, such as art, dresses, or historical-modern day humor. For the most part it relates or at least mixes it up a little. Feel free to look around or leave a comment. Welcome to Period Dramarama.

memory-of-the-romanovs:

The Romanovs and their palaces. Александровский дворец | Alexander Palace | Russia | Pushkin town (Tsarskoe Selo) | 24 kilometers (15 mi) south from the center of St. Petersburg.

[ part I | part II The Alexander Palace during the reign of the last Russian Emperor Nicholas II and his family.

(via calantheandthenightingale)

— 2 days ago with 468 notes
#fun 

I think some people are so sealed inside their fate that they hide deep within their mind.

I think some people are so sealed inside their fate that they hide deep within their mind.

(Source: pearls-and-petticoats)

— 3 days ago with 54 notes

The tallest stone of the circle was cleft, with a vertical split dividing the two massive pieces. Oddly, the pieces had been drawn apart by some means. Though you could see that the facing surfaces matched, they were separated by a gap of two or three feet. 

There was a deep humming noise coming from somewhere near at hand. I thought there might be a beehive lodged in some crevice of the rock, and placed a hand on the stone in order to lean into the cleft.

The stone screamed.

(Source: libbymasters, via reinedidon)

— 5 days ago with 329 notes

Pompeii (Canada - Germany, 2014)

(Source: in-love-with-movies, via charitysplace)

— 1 week ago with 261 notes

 The unqualified truth is, that when I loved Estella with the love of a man, I loved her simply because I found her irresistible. Once for all; I knew to my sorrow, often and often, if not always, that I loved her against reason, against promise, against peace, against hope, against happiness, against all discouragement that could be. Once for all; I love her none the less because I knew it, and it had no more influence in restraining me, than if I had devoutly believed her to be human perfection.

The unqualified truth is, that when I loved Estella with the love of a man, I loved her simply because I found her irresistible. Once for all; I knew to my sorrow, often and often, if not always, that I loved her against reason, against promise, against peace, against hope, against happiness, against all discouragement that could be. Once for all; I love her none the less because I knew it, and it had no more influence in restraining me, than if I had devoutly believed her to be human perfection.

(Source: pearls-and-petticoats, via pearls-and-petticoats)

— 1 week ago with 25 notes
muirin007:

Christine’s age progression. "Progression" seems misleading, considering there are only two images here, but meh. I’ve always imagined that Christine grew into one of those inordinately elegant older women who become even more beautiful with age. Audrey Hepburn was a big inspiration here—beautiful inside and out, at 20 and at 60. Here I wanted to show Christine in her 20s (when she met Erik) and in her (early?) 70s.
It’s so odd when you think about it because if Christine was 20 in 1881, she was 70 in 1931. What a world of difference between those two years. I’m continually amazed thinking about people who lived through the Victorian era and the 20th century, a time span covering some of the most incredible social, political, technological, artistic, and scientific advances in human history. What must it have been like for a woman who, in her youth, donned corsets and bustles and rode in carriages to grow old in a world of cars, movies, telephones, and, horror of horrors, shorter skirts? Did the world seem bigger for her? Smaller? More troubled than ever? Or just as troubled, but in different ways? Do we witness the same monumental changes but our own subjectivity bars us from appreciating them?
I won’t post my full spiel here because I always end up typing a wall of text, but if you’d like to read it, you can find it here in the artist’s comments. :)

muirin007:

Christine’s age progression. "Progression" seems misleading, considering there are only two images here, but meh. I’ve always imagined that Christine grew into one of those inordinately elegant older women who become even more beautiful with age. Audrey Hepburn was a big inspiration here—beautiful inside and out, at 20 and at 60. Here I wanted to show Christine in her 20s (when she met Erik) and in her (early?) 70s.


It’s so odd when you think about it because if Christine was 20 in 1881, she was 70 in 1931. What a world of difference between those two years. I’m continually amazed thinking about people who lived through the Victorian era and the 20th century, a time span covering some of the most incredible social, political, technological, artistic, and scientific advances in human history. What must it have been like for a woman who, in her youth, donned corsets and bustles and rode in carriages to grow old in a world of cars, movies, telephones, and, horror of horrors, shorter skirts? Did the world seem bigger for her? Smaller? More troubled than ever? Or just as troubled, but in different ways? Do we witness the same monumental changes but our own subjectivity bars us from appreciating them?

I won’t post my full spiel here because I always end up typing a wall of text, but if you’d like to read it, you can find it here in the artist’s comments. :)

(via capybaracosette)

— 1 week ago with 521 notes
#fun